Nina Winthrop and Dancers

 

  PREVIOUS WORKS


That's Me - I'm the One Lying Down Over There- Danspace Project, 2006
"That's Me..." is an evening-length multimedia work. It brings together four pieces, each of which can stand alone, but here are interwoven into a lush and textured world. Choreographed by Nina Winthrop in collaboration with dancers Renee Archibald, Laura Arrington, Charlotte Gibbons and Jennifer Lafferty; Video by Maria Antelman; Original music by Jon Gibson; Costumes by Naoko Nagata; Lighting by Peter West; Design Consultant: Maya Ciarrocchi.

Opening - Dixon Place, 2005
A female solo exposing the transformation from a confined and inattentive physical state to one that is finally sensitized and awake. Choreographed by Nina Winthrop in collaboration with dancer Charlotte Gibbons; Original music by Jon Gibson; Costume by Naoko Nagata; Lighting by Peter West.

Self Service - The Flea Theater, 2005
A solo focusing on the process of a woman’s self-discovery, culminating in her realization that serving others does not necessarily serve her. Choreographed by Nina Winthrop; Original music by Jon Gibson; Costumes by Naoko Nagata; Lighting by Peter West; Performed by Joanna Kotze.

I'm at Sixes and Sevens - The Yard, August 2004
"I'm at Sixes and Sevens" is a work for four dancers that shifts back to a child’s world-view of the self and its relation to others. Magnifying the unformed and confused images of reality that children struggle with, it utilizes humor and edginess to create a fluctuating social arena. Original music: Jon Gibson; Costumes: Naoko Nagata; Lighting: Peter West; Dancers: Renee Archibald, Charlotte Gibbons, Jill Locke and Jessica Loof.

Cumulus - 2004, The Flea Theater, NYC
"Cumulus" is a multidisciplinary work in progress about time, aging and the accumulation of memories, made in collaboration with video artist Maria Antelman and composer/musician Jon Gibson. Costumes: Naoko Nagata; Lighting: Peter West. Dancers: Renee Archibald, Megan Brunsvold, Joanna Kotze and Netta Yerushalmy.

Prism - 2002, Joyce SoHo, NYC
Three works for five dancers, inspired by the “Seven Deadly Sins.” Original music: Jon Gibson; Costumes: Naoko Nagata; Lighting: Peter West. Dancers: Carrie Ahern, Tzeni Argyriou, Carolyn Hall, Sia Sourelou and Verena Tremel.

Duelle – 2001, The Flea Theater, NYC.
A duet for three dancers, inspired by Ingmar Bergman’s film Persona. One woman occupies the foreground, and the other, the background. Each works with her own unique expressions and timing, reflecting the dual nature of a sole character. Original music: Jon Gibson; Set: Jene Highstein; Costumes: Naoko Nagata; Lighting: Peter West. Dancers: Tzeni Argyriou, Amanda Loulaki and Brad Mackenzie.

Exissenssuelle - 2001, Joyce SoHo, NYC
A young woman’s struggle to avoid crushing tomatoes and setting off alarm clocks strewn throughout the stage. Her garments become stained with red juice at each misstep. Exissenssuellle premiered as an evening length work at La Venue in Los Angeles in 1994. It has since been recreated with new choreography and music. Choreography/costumes/set: Nina Winthrop; Original music: Jon Gibson; Lighting: Peter West. Dancer: Carrie Ahern.

Three Lives and Something – 1998, Danspace Project, NYC
Four lanes separate the dancers’ movements, derived from everyday activities. Throughout the piece, the dancers move back and forth in the parallel lanes of their physically separated, yet thematically connected, lives. Original music: Jon Gibson; Set: Jene Highstein; Lighting: Peter West 2001; Costumes: Naoko Nagata. Dancers: Carrie Ahern, Tzeni Argyriou, Amanda Loulaki and Brad Mackenzie.

Stalling Into Elation – 1998, Danspace Project, NYC.
A mixed media solo, constructed as a series of portraits of emotional milestones. A dancer journeys through subconscious space. Memories wash over her, and she paints them into the air with her body. Original music: Jon Gibson; Video: Jene Highstein; Costumes: Naoko Nagata; Lighting: Peter West (2001), Oguri (1997). Dancer: Amanda Loulaki.

Finalmente – 1997, La Boca, Los Angeles. 1996; Highstein Studio, NYC
An attractive young man enters a vividly colored landscape. The backdrop is a scrim on which constantly shifting images of sculpture are projected. He is dressed simply in brilliant blue and frolics on a deep lush green lawn strewn. Music: Ben White; Costumes: Anita Evenepoel; Lighting: Spencer Mosse. Dancer: Steven Craig

Proximity – 1995, Industria, NYC
A metal structural skeleton defines three rooms on one side of a corridor and two rooms on the other side. The audience are voyeurs gazing through the “walls” and down the length of the "hall’ to witness an intimate portrait of a neighborhood and community in (sub) urban society. Set: David Auden; Costumes: Anita Evenepoel.

That’s Life, Man! – 1995, Pink Inc, NYC
A duet, divided into three sections. A man and woman enter a white box in a large white room, and begin to spread ink-black sand onto the floor in concentric circles. A large target emerges, into which each is drawn. The couple becomes entangled in a love duet, shuffling and twisting across the floor, as the concentric circles of the target are slowly scuffed away. Set and costumes: Nina Winthrop; Lighting: Spencer Mosse; Music: NO Zen Orchestra, Dead Can Dance; Dancers: Mark de Chiazza, Ester Sanchez.

A Trilogy – 1993, Cunningham Studio, NYC
The set is an abstract forest of ten-foot silver trees, and long vertical pipes, which hang small white spotlights. The dancers approach one another, back away, then approach the lights, which glow brighter and brighter with the promise of communication. Again, they back away, trapped in a ritual dance of random communications. Set: David Auden; Lighting: Spencer Mosse. Dancers: Stanley Love, Ester Sanchez, Marc Kenison, Allison Ulan, Melissa Wynn.

5 New Works – 1993, Riverside Theater
An evening compiled of five pieces. The works are abstract, fragmentary, emotional portraits of melancholy, surrender, grief, despair, and love. The music ranges from the grating tones of Diamanda Galas to Dead Can Dance, Tom Waits and the industrial post-modernist Einsturzende Nebauten. Lighting: Spencer Mosse. Dancers: Jennifer Arnold, Marina Celander, Carl Fink, Marc Kenison, Fawn Wong.

Iphigenia in Tauris – 1992, Cunningham Studio, NYC
A narrative piece based on Euripides’ play. This piece for ten dancers explores the themes of rule, tyranny, sacrifice, compassion, and transformation. Music: John Cale; Sculpture: Jene Highstein; Sets and lighting: Manuel Lutgenhorst; Costumes: Lenny Steinberg; Dancers: Jennifer Arnold, Fawn Wong, Alberto Del Saz, Joan Finkelstein, Carl Fink, Reid Hutchins, Sam Yip, Peggy Wallins, Ed Tyler, Richard Move.